The need for speed – Salmon Reykjavik


I blogged previously about the need to unwind after work, ready to enjoy family and writing time. I realise trouble switching off is rivalled by cooking and cleaning when it comes to keeping one from what’s most important. (Anyone who knows me will be reading this post through narrowed eyes now, knowing that I’ve already given up on the cleaning…)

Anyway, with this in mind, I’ve decided to track down some time-saving tips from family and friends. I’m kicking off with a super-fast supper recipe, courtesy of Charlie. It’s party-ish enough to work for visitors, as well as family.
Salmon Reykjavik*
Serves 4
Ingredients
1 onion
3 cloves of garlic
Olive oil, or whatever sort you have
2 good-sized salmon fillets or, for special occasions, 180g smoked salmon (amount can be varied according to taste/what’s available)
500g cherry tomatoes
2 dessertspoonsful of pesto
White wine – a glassful or so
450g spaghetti (if you’re hogs like we are…)
Parmesan/Grana Padano, and some rocket, to garnish.
Method
(The method below was using a gas hob; for electric the timings might need to be varied)

  • Put a kettleful of water on to boil.
  • Chop onions into small pieces and crush garlic (or use the Very Lazy variety). Chop the salmon into smallish cubes – square inches if using smoked, slightly smaller if using standard. Cut cherry tomatoes in half if they’re large.
  • Put the spaghetti on to cook, with a dash of olive oil in the water, then fry the onion and garlic in more of the oil. Shortly after this add the salmon, unless you’re using smoked.
  • When there are around six minutes left on the pasta clock, add the cherry tomatoes and fry.
  • When there are a couple of minutes left on the pasta, add the wine and pesto and simmer.
  • If you’re using smoked salmon, add this with only a minute to go.
  • Drain the spaghetti and dish onto plates. Divide the sauce between these and serve on top of the pasta. Garnish with Parmesan or Grana Padano, and rocket on the side.

*Probably salmon. The labelling was in Icelandic, so it’s hard to be certain. We have been using salmon ever since…
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